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D&D maker still wants to revoke earlier versions of “open” gaming license

Core rules would go under Creative Commons, “hateful” content would be barred.

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<img src="https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/dndrevoke-800×400.png" alt="Artist's conception of D&D-maker Wizards of the Coast trying to destroy its original Open Gaming License with fire.”>

Enlarge / Artist’s conception of D&D-maker Wizards of the Coast trying to destroy its original Open Gaming License with fire. (credit: Lego / WotC)

Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) maker Wizards of the Coast’s (WotC) latest attempt to update its decades-old Open Gaming License (OGL) still includes the controversial statement that “the Open Game License 1.0a is no longer an authorized license.” The news comes after the company’s first attempt to draft an OGL update with similar language (and other controversial changes) was met with widespread fan outrage and alienation from the creator community.

WotC says this proposed “deauthorization” of OGL v1.0a won’t affect any original content that was published under that earlier license since its debut in the early ’00s and that such content won’t need to be updated or relicensed to comply with any new OGL language. But any content published after the proposed OGL v1.2 goes into effect would not be able to simply choose the earlier license instead, according to the update as drafted.

In an explanatory post on the D&D Beyond blog, WotC Executive Producer Kyle Brink said that WotC realizes this planned deauthorization is a “big concern” for the community. But he added that it’s a necessary move to enforce the new OGL’s restrictions on illegal and/or hateful content, including “conduct that is harmful, discriminatory, illegal, obscene, or harassing,” as determined by WotC.

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